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colleagues tend to be older man, educated in a certain way that did not study such matters. most historians were not educated in matters of a heart or the hearth. therefore they ignore that. it is on cannon's crowds of kings. so by studying the first lady, for example, the first thing thomas jefferson did after spending 17 days cooped up in eight lost outside of philadelphia writing the declaration of independence, the first thing he does go shopping. he went shopping for martha, his wife. mr. she was preggers. she had had a miscarriage. he mr., and he bought her some clothes. then he begged off from serving for the rest of the summer so that he could go home to monticello to be with his wife. every winter of the revolutionary war, right there in campus is george washington suffering through the freezing weather at valley forge was martha washington with her white on it right there in camp. so by studying the first ladies, we get new insights, i think, the presidents and other things. also, washington's closest adviser was alexander hamilton. and one of the chapters in the book talks about
-to-day basis. this library is a model of educating young people. it is really remarkable and a lot of that goes to the energy that drives them to be candid with john burns says. thank you so much for your work. [applause] >> thank you for keeping mrs. reagan in your prayers. she is a remarkable woman who has spent a lifetime serving this country. she continues to be active and playable here at the library. i couldn't come here and not mention her for at least a moment. governor, we have done a lot of things over the years. from the mayor to u.s. senator governor, i look to them as great people who have a willingness to serve their country. it is always a family engagement if you're out there. thank you both for serving the country. it really does make a difference. it's wonderful to be back here. [applause] >> i didn't know you'd be with us, but we are thrilled to have you here tonight. we have launched what we call an american legacy book tour. we are very fond of the library, as you know. we made a movie about ronald reagan and i would like to recognize tonight kevin and his wife. he was the
. >> was different? do you think that educators should allow more choice among the young [inaudible question] >> this is a fascinating question we could spend an hour on. must public-school education, that's what you are suggesting. i know that's what you're suggesting. [laughter] >> okay. one of the things that i have found, and i only took over this in recent years. i have gone over certain things. in high school i was exposed to stuff the bored me to death at the time. thirty or for 40 years later, i remember it with vividness. and then we have an appreciation i can still remember the night watch. canterbury tales by chaucer. all of these things that our children need to be exposed to and not just how i pass this math and science tests. how i get through the next day. it would be a shame we don't expose our children to the right things and give them greater choice with what they want to do with their life. most of them at that age are not sure. sooner or later, something will touch them. i know where i'd be if my life and have been a pattern of 17. keep looking for the thing that you'd do
and he only been working at goodyear just a little over one year. he had less education unless experience. and he already made $600 more a month than i did from a lower paying job. the judge calculated my two years backpay, and i was given 30,000 per year. so i left the courtroom with $360,000. the headlines said from california to chicago to new york and florida, all across this nation -- the headlines read jacksonville, alabama, woman awarded $3.8 million from goodyear tire and rubber. they say that i got that money. the gadsden headline said that as well. i got a lot of compliments of the headlines in the news. well, that was 2003. he went to the 11th circuit record and then my guilt was hurt in the supreme court in november of 2006. life goes on. we had our normal family life the best we could do. but i worked the case just like it was a job. i called over 100 people to find the people that we needed to testify on my behalf. people were afraid of losing their jobs. they were so afraid. that is why they switched over. most of this was color coded. but life went on and my husband had tw
aspect. that is education. i think of the national level or state level rules for sort of outcomes in education. i'm looking at this map and as you pointed out, not only is it is map where crime is in the city, it's a map where you have low performing schools. ought we not put lead on top of our outcomes and not saying you have to close your school because you are dealing with students who are lead poisoned. >> correct. the mapping of a city is really easy to do. it's much -- ethically, it's more important to do something like that where you get at the source than measure blood level. we use the child to indicate what is environment is like and try to turn it around to primary prevention in measuring the environment and try to prevent the child from getting exposed. it turns out soil is very easy to measure the amount of lead in soil. we are doing a lot of work in the city of new orleans to try to advance changing the environment so that children don't get exposed. >> i really appreciate that shift. rather than thinking of the kid as the problem, we think of the environment. thank
wants to get an education, that -- is because the whole state was in an insurrection from the governors, the state house itself down to the 11-year-old who was starring bricks in the street. it was total chaos, total mayhem . even the mississippi highway patrol had pulled away, so there was year insurrection. the -- it lasted two or three days, the violent part, and after that i was appointed to be a security officer for james meredith and went to school with him. he went to school. i stayed outside with a hand-picked patrol, three jeeps, 12 soldiers and we were there throughout the year. we transfer back and forth. almost one year until he graduated in august of 1963. i was 23 years old. i grew up in an all white neighborhood in south minneapolis. that was pretty much it. and so it was an eye-opening for me, but, again, we were trained, and i'm so proud of what the army did. when you write a book, and this is my first, the publisher has the say on what the title should be. i would call it mississippi morning because we will come up with 6:00 in the morning. tear gas said past, the sun
mean to the education camps and execution and all of those things. so i think the discussion that has to be made between leaders and their constituents is that if we see something that we can rectify, we should. but we have to understand the limitations of those interventions, because you are far worse off if you fail if you have never gone there to start with. this brings us to syria. i'm ashamed. i'm ashamed. i'm ashamed as an american. i've been to refugee camps and met the women have been gang raped. i've met the families have watched their kids shot before their eyes. i've met the defectors who said their instructions are to go around and kill and rape and torture. and while we sit by and watch that happen, without even giving them weapons to defend themselves, this will be a shameful chapter in american history, my friends, because we could've done something. and we can do something today but we won't. i hear that the new president has been reelected, we will be re-examining all. only 37,000 people have been massacred, i guess in the grand scheme of things that's not too many co
for years of girls education in pakistan. she wants equal rights. she had a blog she spoke out about what was like being a young girl in the swat valley in pakistan, for all of that targeted tore the for the taliban and pulled over her school bus as she was on the way home from school and shot her in the head. miraculously, she survived, thanks to the great work of some pakistan and british doctors. she's now out of the hospital. what's the update on malala and what's next for her? >> she is out of the hospital and her father got a job in britain so her family will remain in britain, where she will be a little bit safer. they will have a little bit of security. but her life, it's going to be an uphill battle trying to protect ser he have from now on because she has become a symbol of freedom to many women in the islamic world and this is why she is he' going to remain a target and a major target by radicals who think it's a medal of honor to kill her and basically put fear in the hearts of the rest of population in the islamic world and who want to pursue education and rebellion. >> in fa
's important in the cities, on who is deciding where the money is going to go between safety and education. you talked about your state legislatures, it's incredibly important. we need women to really get engaged in politics, and we need them to run for office. we need more and more women to run for office, and we focus on democrats, and one of our big focuses in the next many years is to get more women to run for the legislature to run for city council to run for mayor's races, because that's our pipeline for congress, but it's also the regulations and laws getting passed every day that are affecting our lives and the lives of our families. >> thank you. other questions? >> i'm a journalist for -- [inaudible] >> in addition to -- i've also seen coverage that women are no longer big bloc that politicians can get with one issue and women maybe did make a difference because you can no longer count on them to just vote on issues -- can you address that question ask the challenge for you and in general in seeing women as a monolithic voting bloc. >> i've always thought it was odd -- because i've be
in education and infrastructure that help our economy grow. keep in mind that the threat of tax heights going up is only one part of this so-called fiscal cliff. what we also have facing us starting tomorrow or automatic spending cuts that are scheduled to go into effect. keep in mind that some of these spending cuts that congress has said will automatically go into effect have an impact on our defense department but that also have an impact on things like head start. there are some programs that are scheduled to be cut. we are using an ax instead of a scalpel. it may not always be the smartest cuts. that is a piece of business that still has to be taken care of. i want to make clear that any agreement we have to deal with these automatic spending cuts, those also have to be balanced. my principle has always been to do things in a balanced, responsible way and that means revenues as to be part of the equation in turning off the sequester as well as spending cuts. the same is true for any future deficit agreement. we will have to do more to reduce our debt and deficit. i am willing to do more
vital issues in the pending tray marked too difficult. so we've broken the monopoly of state education with free schools providing excellent education free to parents who send their children there. we've also established 2,000 academy schools. we've stopped dumbing down. we've introduced tough new powers on discipline in the classroom. there's a whole set of issues that are subject to this long-term reform from this government, issues like putting our universities on a sustainable footing so they can compete with the very best in the world and give everyone a chance to go to them irrespective of their background or income, modernizing our energy and transport infrastructure so we can keep up with our competitors in the global race, regulating our banks properly, so that immoral behavior and the gross mistakes of the past are not repeated. we're dealing with the challenges of an ageing population. we've reformed public-sector pensions so they are both affordable and fair for both public-sector workers and the taxpayer. in every case, we've put the national interest at the heart of this
the world is how does it treat its women. does it educate that half of the population? does it give them opportunity? when it does, you unleash the power of everyone. not just some. and i think there was great wisdom in afghanistan ratifying a constitution that recognized that. that should be part of the legacy of these last ten years. okay. thank you very much, everybody. >> so there they are, the two presidents, the afghan president, the american president, wrapping up a news conference. they made lengthy statements and answered four questions between them. most importantly, the president suggesting there is a possibility that the u.s. troop withdrawal from afghanistan could even be accelerated over the next two years, though he's not yet ready to make any final decisions. he's waiting for recommendations from his military leadership. on the same front, he's saying there is no decision made how many u.s. troops will remain in afghanistan after 2014. although he says every u.s. troop who does remain will be required to have immunity from afghan prosecution as a general condition. and we
equalizer in our society is and always has been public education. the democrats allowed control of our schools, and the republicans permitted the idea that a magnet school, or a charter school is an adequate replacement for engaged, well-paid, focused teachers who act at the direction of their local school district, not the national education association or the national federation of teachers or any other union. we have-- >> about that fight there. >> and we have so many disconnects and the penalty is found in the drop-out rate of this country. they are an absolute disgrace and we have educators, secretary of education, karen lewis in chicago, leading the the employees union, they are a disgrace because they're acting as if they have the problem in hand. meanwhile, school districts are going bankrupt, the teachers' organization admit they're working for themselves and not for the students, and the parents are not engaged in the teaching of those young people, who are our future. >> megyn: but it's the point that knowledge is power and better educated the children are whether they're on
administration has not delivered on its campaign promises, things like dismantling the department of education, getting rid of the department of energy, cutting down on government spending. clearly government spending is far more than it was when reagan took office. taxes are greater. in terms of performance, in terms of delivering our campaign promises in 1988 think it is indeed a failure in that sense. now, it's a success in another sense, namely that i think that the level of debate has been raised in our country on a whole range of issues. a key one is the legitimate role of government in a free society. c-span: that is a call in show here at the end of the reagan administration. what is your reaction when you hear that today? >> guest: well, there is not much that has changed. we still need to ask, or settle, what is the legitimate role of government in a free society and a legitimatlegitimat e role of government in a free society is not that of government taking what belongs to one american and giving it to another american to whom it does not the long. c-span: have you ever in your life
the list of people -- of the really wealthy people and what they paid in taxes. it's a real education to go become and look at that. and i can't imagine what that education would look like today. if you had the same two pieces of information. >> host: one more question before we go to calls. you said you have to -- do you have to be a so-called egyptologist to read bills. >> guest: the taxes are the most demanding. it's not so much you have to have any special training. you just have to be patient. you have to read it and then try to follow it through. go back through it to see exactly who it applies to. some of these were actually quite obscure. some in terms of special interest provisions and a company incorporated in some state on such and such date, required us to then go to that state and very often go through whatever the filings were for them. one thing we ran across had to do with one company which issued 97 million in bonds or something like that. so, we had some of the database people who inquired, will you search this lexus, and see if anybody issued a bond in that amount. and su
, the need for poll workers training to be clear and voters to be a better educated. from my perspective those are systems of a system that is not designed for this kind of thing. we are asking pol workers to do more today than was ever contemplated when the idea of having a community poll workers was conceived. in my jurisdiction trying to serve 12 different languages across 4800 different polling places on election day is not a model that is sustainable. >> one last comment before i move on to don rehill, it is very valuable to have individuals like yourself who are both an election official but also a county clerk, engage in the discussion about the next generation of voting systems. for those of us to deal exclusively with voting systems we are a bit myopic at times about where we see government solutions going to. county clerks on the other hand, their offices are filled with applications that provide the kinds of services at a level and a cost point that their constituents are looking for beyond voting systems. i really like that perspective that you bring. as i said earlier many o
of education. for example, the bathroom walls almost every day are covered here and there with "white power" and white power symbols, with slogans such as "blacks are only good for being slaves," and "whites rule over blacks," as well as labeling the working water fountains "whites only," and the non-working fountains "blacks only." and it's extremely difficult to deal with. there is an intense amount of stereotyping as well as hatred floating in the minds and mouths of students and staff of the hanshaw--hanshew and service anchorage school district. i know by personal experience. 'i feel that this is absolutely horrible, that the wars that we as a minority, african-americans, puerto-ricans, etc. , fought many years back have to be refought over and over as the days go by. it's sad that people can't have their own opinions and approve and disapprove without discriminating others. it's a shame that there is only two times in life that we as people with skin and culture differences are seen as equals. those two important days are our first and last days of your--of your life. for example, whe
stamps. how about finding people jobs and education they can help themselves and their families out of poverty. no, bob, i'm not talking about the simple moms with two or three kids. i'm not talking about feeding children or feeding families. i'm talking about abuse in the system. >> bob: those are facts and strip clubs. does anybody have facts about what percentage of people abuse it like that. >> estimates have been 25-30% of that. hanks saloon and blue door video shop and soho lounge and drinks galore. >> bob: if i were to list food stores i could go on for years. it's nice thing to bring it out and makes it exciting, it is ridiculous. food stamps are needed by most people that need them. and paycheck issue that you refer to in the two or three twits or tweets, whatever you call them. you underestimated the american people intelligence. when they are getting a cut in pay local taxes, it's not much money. at first it was cut. when obama did this at the last minute. >> the point of that was, democrats never saw the paycheck coming. >> bob: you are making it sound like, everybody is
. and with box tops for education on every box, it helps you help your school. so you're doing good, just by making dinner. hamburger helper. available at walmart. >> they have been ordered to stop all operations in the united states. this after officials determined that one of those drivers had not properly rested. he had been on duty for 92 hours exceeding the federal limit of 70 hours after the crash happened. >> they link diet soda and other sugary drinks to depression. those who drank more diet soda cans a day were 30 percent more likely to develop depression. they had to drink four or more each day. experts stressed the findings don't mean that diet soda causes depression. >>> thanks heather. it's a question we ask ourselves from time to time, am noirmal or am i nuts? doctor keith ablow is here to answer some of your fun questions this morning. >> this first one says my mom has to fold hoar wash cloths a certain way the tag must be in a certain spot when she folds them. if not she will refold all of the wash cloths. is she normal or nuts? >> your mom is not normal. this is like a de
there are barriers for women to move into these corporals or into these law firms? do we have an education system supporting women in this process? it comes down to how we are supporting the family structure. that is often what it comes down to. and that is a question for more and more men today. you think about men who are on the part of track and women who are on this mommy track. -- men who are on this partner track and women who are on this mommy track. i know more and more men who want to go coach soccer at night. host: there is a story in psychology today in january talk about women voting and the psychology behind it. part of the information was the data behind the pilot test. guest: it is tough. we just did some research this post-election. there has always been a sense that women will vote for women. women will vote for women if they really see that woman in a way that she is accomplished, viable, and have the same belief system. it is more likely women will vote for democrats first. and there is an 18-point gender gap in the presidential alexian. and it went to president obama. -- in th
to educate around these breakthrough technologies. and it really is part of a game changing opportunity. we think technologies, plural, will continue to refine and develop not only those technologies but many others. >> you under thank you for doing this. >> good to see you again. >> you mentioned the keystone pipeline a couple times in your speech but i wonder if you could come if you have an assessment whether my president obama will reject or approve the pipeline? if he does reject it won't be the political consequences be? >> we are hopeful that he will approve it, and right now we are encouraged i what we're hearing from the white house. obviously, as a result of alleged report coming from the state of nebraska, the governor has to make a final decision that may affect the department of state. but we're hopeful the president will approve. i think we'll look at it from a jobs perspective, from the energy needs of the united states, as prime minister harper said on a number of occasions, it's a no-brainer. so we're hopeful the president will step forward. i think will be an early indicat
as to why we had the '95/'96 government strike. it's the same things. it's about education. it's about medicare. it's about the environment. you talked about going on vacation and coming back and hearing the same thing. we're talking about the same thing from '95 as we are today. we haven't really decided yet what type of country we want to be and how we want to spend the money in order to get there. we spend a great deal of money on education. we probably spend more money per student than any other industrialized nations. yet when you look at the collective global testing, we're somewhere in the middle of the pack. so the conversation we need to be having isn't just about how much money or how are we spending that money, and is this moving us towards the type of country we want to be? >> that's much too complicated. i'm just kidding. >> this is the point. this is the debate. there has to be a debate. we're going to debate how we spend our money. we're now talking about when we have the debates. we should be having it in the traditional manner in which the governments operate. if we do
them more educated on social media. with that learning point or teaching point per se, i think we have to be aware of, hey, these are situations that can happen. and, unfortunately, it's come to light in steubenville, ohio. >> the case attracted a new wave of national attention when a video went viral. two students have been charged with the rape of a 16-year-old girl. >>> big news for those americans trying to adopt russian children. a law signed by president putton last month won't go into effect for one year, which means some adoptions can proceed giving some family who's were close new hope. this is seen as retaliation on human rights abusers in russia really sad that families and kids being caught in the middle of an international dispute. >>> this may be the best drive through prank ever. an as spiring magician created a driver's seat costume that makes it look like nobody is driving the car at all. he went through a bunch of fast food drivers and recorded the stunned, freaked out employees. >> oh mshg, my god. >> hello. what the heck is that? oh, my god. oh, my god. >> oh, my go
into education, too. i recommend all of the listeners take a look. the guy won the academy award for best documentary. instead of saying thank you to the academy, the first thing he said was, i want to tell everybody that not one of these bankers is in jail. host: what is your concern about having experience on wall street and coming into a government position? caller: i think it is a transfer of wealth. one of the callers mentioned he did a really good job. you asked a good job for two, and he said his buddies on wall street. look at the banker bailouts that we have had. henry paulson, even in the elections when congress voted it down the first time, the banker bail out the last month or so of george bush's administration. obama and mccain came off of the campaign trails. they got on the phone and they got the congressional black caucus to change their votes and twist some arms and it passed and obama became president. i announcing that is why he became president, but you have to look at where the money is coming from. host: he is asking questions about jack lew, the next secretary of tr
and bear arms. advancing the shooting sports. championing gun safety, education and training. creating a vital legacy by answering freedom's call. and we are growing stronger every day. we are the n.r.a. and the n.r.a. is you. host: that is from the n.r.a. two stories you can find online and front page of the leading newspapers. "new york times" looking at symbols of grief piling up. from the "washington post" broad strategy on guns being weighed far beyond the ban on assault weapons. they are on their websites. we will continue the conversation on the agenda ahead as lawmakers return the start of the 113th congress. president back in washington later t today. later, looking at just what members of congress earn, pensions and salary. we will have more with daniel shuman of the sunlight foundation. keeping track of other programs. good morning, nancy. >> good morning, steve. on today's shows the fallout from the fiscal cliff a look at the second term in office. all five re-air on c-span radio with nbc's "meet the press." today's the guests include mitch mcconnell, former republican sena
. it starts in third grade. and through their whole educational experience, they continually get indoctrine nated. >> it's not just the numbers that are cooked, it's the history books, too. >> they were very liberally booised saying when george bush went in there, there were weapons of mass destruction. >> huh? huh? maybe our friends over at fox need to go back to school. that's exactly what happened in iraq. it's not a liberal conspiracy. it's history. these guys can name sponge bob and math homework all in one. thanks for watching, i'm al sharpton. "hardball" starts right now. >> we're going into nut country. let's play "hardball." >>> we're going into nut country. let's play "hardball." ♪ >>> good evening. i'm chris matthews in washington. let me start tonight with this, paranoid america is climbing out of its bunker. the near possibility that the obama administration might stop the easy sale of the scariest guns to the scariest people has aroused the slippery slope crowd. these cousins of the grassy knoll folks believe that any limit on the wide open market for guns and ammo threatens
of education and specialization, those tend to be going begging. there are opportunities there. it takes a lot of schooling an effort to get yourself where you're in position to take those jobs. -- and effort to get yourself where you're in a position to take those jobs. if you want to be a waitress, you can probably find a job. if you want to be a brain surgeon, you can probably find a job. if you want to be an aircraft mechanic making $38 an hour, that can be a lot tougher. there is one thing that is helping with that, this energy resurgence. we're seeing an awful lot of energy jobs being created because of this process the people referred to as a fracking. and conventional means of extracting oil and gas. -- unconvential means of extracting oil and gas. another area that is doing pretty well is spinoffs from agriculture. if we have a somewhat normal year in terms of whetheather ths agricultureverage purchase o sector. there are some points of hope within that structure is generally true that the low- paying jobs -- structure. it is generally true that low- paying jobs and high-paying jobs a
the class when it comes to the latest rankings of the nation's school systems. education week rates the stake first in the country in its quality counts survey. it still has work to do. it received the highest grade of b. plus. the district ranks 45th though with a c. minus. the national average is a c. plus. >>> we are getting a first look now at the design of a possible new chuck brown memorial and park. the plans call for the chuck brown memorial to go up at lang don park in northwest washington and the tribute to the godfather of go go music was designed by the same firm that designed the howard theater. that came out great. mayor gray presented the plans yesterday and brown's family members and musicians were also on hand for that. >> the park in northeast d.c.. >>> it is 5:05. time for the latest your money report of the morning. >> and jessica doyle is here with a look at the headlines. good morning. >> good morning, investors are going to start the morning from a pretty good looking perch. how good is it? how about the best peg in about five years? the s&p 500 stands today a
to a championship in 1964, what do you remember about that? >> it was not only a thrill, but it was an education as well. at that age in life, i really understood that it was about us, us, not me. starting with our coach and our players and all, knowing how difficult it was to achieve, one guy doesn't do it. and one guy doesn't excel without the help of his peers and that's the way life is. so going through that in college and learning how important it was to establish the kind of relationships that is necessary to continue to grow, that's what that was about. that was part of it. sure, the achievement, but knowing it is more than you. >> of course. you have your teammates. come on, imagine these guys and i could be wrong, but are they just so incredibly nervous right now or are they just focused? >> well, i think that -- well, i know, i know the nerves are there, actually they have been basically climbing the walls without literally doing it since last night. you get up today, it is one of the longest days of their lives, and this is a positive day. usually, you know, time drags on when somethi
™. hamburger helper can help you back. and with box tops for education on every box, it helps you help your school. so you're doing good, just by making dinner. hamburger helper. available at walmart. >> steve: tomorrow on our big show, general stanley mccrystal is out. he tells his side of the story on why he quit. you'll see it here on the "fox & friends" show. >> brian: i just realized i got to finish the book. it's somewhere on the couch. >> gretchen: michelle malkin. have a fantastic day. >> brian: stay within yourself. here we go. want to start with a fox news alert. there is a new plea for help from the family of a former fbi agent van fishing in iran five years ago. robert levinson disin 2007. family is releasing disturbing new pictures sent from whomever is holding him, we believe. there is a "america's newsroom." i'm bill hemmer. good morning, martha. martha: good to see you. i'm martha maccallum. intelligence officials believe iran is holding him as a bargaining chip essentially, something tehran vehemently denies at this point. the new pictures show a haggard levinson than in ea
of experience in public service and higher education and an incredibly wide variety of roles as president of the world bank, dean of the johns hopkins school of international studies, the state department director of policy planning in this is the secretary of state for east asian affairs and long term at the pentagon all the way to dippy secretary of defense. a great panel, and so what i will do is pose a question to each one of them to kick off the conversation, and then i will turn it over to all of you. the first question i want to pose to mike, and it is a basic, simple one. what the heck happened on new year's day and the and what does it mean for defense? what do you see playing out in the next days, weeks, moving forward, and what are some of the key, strategic questions you see coming off of that? >> thanks, peter. thanks to all of you for being here. we heard bob hale wrestling with these unnatural questions. we have a 2-month reprieve keeping this among, if not topple the list for the most unstable budgetary decision making ever, especially when there is no big surprise in term
like shutting down the department of education, the department of labor, the epa. we could say it in a better way. most black folks work at the epa. if we say we're going to shut them down, who is going to vote for us? guest: that is a good point. i always say the enemy of good government is 30 seconds, because all politicians get is 30 seconds, and the lesson we have learned is when you have a candidate that can deliver a clear conservative message, they wind. marco rubio wins. but jeff -- jeff blake won in arizona. everyone, regardless of race or religion has the opportunity to succeed, and america offers better opportunities -- offers that opportunity. i do not think republicans have been inspiring in their message. there are younger senators, governors, house members than very good and a relative basis and to live in that message. -- in delivering that message. tim scott is one of the most aspiring politicians i have encountered in many years marco rubio has the ability to communicate a message better than anyone that has come along in recent years. they are good examples,
. >> the primary goal and focus of the museum is education. do you get a sense that there is a great thirst for knowledge about the second world war among the younger people who visit that museum? >> reporter: i do, matt. my own personal experience is that the baby boomers who came along after the war, it was not part of their memory. but all the books that have been written about that time and they realize what their parents went through. first the depression and then the war and how much we owe them and how much was at stake. so young people are coming here and learning the magnitude of this war. 50 million people perished in world war ii, fought on six of the seven continents. the british military historian says the largest single event in the history of mankind. so big that we're just now beginning to come to grips with how important it is in the 20th century and for mankind through the years. >> tom, for your work in making it an even better place, we congratulate you. thanks for joining us this morning. >> reporter: all right. one more thing, matt. the paratroopers who landed on d-day
, by thinking about where want your education to lead, while you're still in school, you might find the best route... leads somewhere you weren't even looking. let's get to work. [ male announcer ] every time you say no to a cigarette you celebrate a little win. nicorette gum helps calm your cravings and makes you less irritable. quit one cigarette at a time. and makes you less irritable. minute maid pure squeezed light has half the... sugar and calories of oj with great taste. i mean, who doesn't want to cut calories and look better naked? you roll around in your birthday suit all day. you're not even wearing a produce sticker. minute maid pure squeezed light. >> now from abc7 news. >> good morning, i am eric thomas. east palo alto is taking steps to prevent further flood damage. members of the conservation will show up a levee at the san francisquito creek. mike, what kind of rain do we get? >> scattered light showers less than .1 itch so no flooding worries. we have fog inland, quarter-mile visibility or less through 9:00. temperatures right now or mostly in the 40's and the 50's with sca
school march with their parents to the board -- marched with their parents to the board of education because they are upset that they want to move gateway middle school to a second building on their campus. parents and students say the school is not big enough to accommodate what would be more than 600 students. >> i'm one of the classes that i did another 6th grade. and we have barely any room now. the hallways are squished. it's very uncomfortable. >> our 8th graders have been ear here since kindergarten and when you include more, that's too much. >> the school district says gateway is currently sharing space and it needs a permanent location. mere meetings with both schools are planned before a final decision is made. >>> 8:24. let's check in with sal. hey, sal, how fast are the cars going -- how fast are the cars going in the south bay. northbound 280, you will see some evidence of this from our live camera network here. northbound. now, in the last few minutes it's improved quite a bit to see a lot of slow traffic here. if you look at the 880 where it turns into 17, that's where
the poison got into his system. >>> two oregon men chose an odd way to educate people about legally carrying weapons as they claim was their goal. they hoped people would engage them in conversation. instead, frightened residents in portland called 911 when they saw assault weapons strapped to their backs. despite the panic, the men really didn't break the law. they are licensed to carry the weapons. >>> the little film that could, and she's the little actress that did. 9-year-old quvenzhane wallis was nominated for her role as hush puppy in "beasts of the southern wild." young youngest best actress nominee ever. she told us her reaction when she got the good news. >> in the hotel room, half asleep, saw my name just rolling down like this. and on the inside i was excited, and just sitting there, boom! i hear stuff just speaking about the film, you, me, stuff like that. >> how sweet is she? "beast of the southern wilds" received four oscar nominations in all. one for best picture and one for its director as well. >> a lot of buzz about that movie. >> such a perfect 9-year-old reaction. there
education and people don't know what they're signing on to. >> now everybody is clear. no money if you can't pay it back. >> in theory. >> oh, cynics, cynics, cynics. >>> ahead on "starting point," we'll tell you what's different about the flu this time around and what's making it so severe. >>> and this, neighbors call 911. they see a ferocious and deadly beast walking the streets. it's actually just a dog. we'll have that story straight ahead. we're back in a moment. >>> welcome back to "starting point." we begin with john berman who has an update on the day's top stories. >>> so the flu is spreading with a vengeance across the u.s. not only did the season get off to a very early start, cases are proving to be far more severe than last year. the cdc's latest flu advisory says 41 states are dealing with widespread activity. more than 2200 people are hospitalized. the hardest hit states, pennsylvania and south carolina, each reporting 22 flu-related deaths. illinois now reporting six deaths. in cases in south dakota spiked, almost doubling in the span of a week. it's so bad in boston they
today's returning heroes can get their education, too. having co-chaired by intelligence advisory board he knows our armed forces collect, analyze, depend on good intelligence. chuck recognizes that american leadership is indispensable in a dangerous world. i saw this in our travel across the middle east. he understands that america stands strongest when we stand with allies and with friends. as a successful businessman, he also knows even as we make tough fiscal choices we have to do so wisely, guided by our strategy and keep our military the strongest fighting force the world has ever known. maybe most importantly, chuck knows that war is not a distraction. he understands that sending young americans to fight, bleed in the dirt, and mud, that's something we only do when it's absolutely necessary. my frame of reference, he has said, is geared towards the guy at the bottom, who is doing the fighting and the dying. with chuck, our troops will always know, just like sergeant hagel was there for his own brother, secretary hagel will be there for you. finally, chuck represents the bipartisa
as chairman of the education committee. it was only in 2006 when tom delay was on the boehner ascended again to be leader of the republican party. he led the party until 20 -- from 2010 until now kept the house for two elections. as much as there is a lot of grumbling about the inner's leadership a lot of republicans who have been in the house for a long time feel the boehner is able to stay in power and bring the party back to power and they applaud that. the ron paul question is an interestiinteresti ng one. ron paul is out of congress and the candidate is no longer there but they there are people who watch them in the house. he is a ron paul acolyte. he would fall under that tradition. justin hall from michigan, sophomore. both amash and thomas massey played a a secret vote in a secret that secret that an nec ron paul's sun center rand paul in the senate and elected in 2010. he is continuing to ron the ron paul movement in many ways. is now on the senate relations committee and you'll hear him talk about the realm paul idea of foreign policy and less foreign aid and more conservative idea
by the pacific health research and education institute. it looked at nearly 800 men who had been treated with blood pressure drugs and beta-blockers. they all showed fewer signs of brain at fee, a classic simple -- atroughy a classic sign of dementia. >>> "telegraph" said the captain of the "costa concordia" saying he was pained worse than osama bin laden. he says he may have made a mistake sailing too close to land but was given incorrect information and should not be the only one to get the blame. >>> the "los angeles times" says there may be more earthlike planets that can support life. nasa researchers have discovered more than 461 planets where life might exist in a rocky environment. >>> a boeing 787 had a fire break out monday on a dreamliner that was parked at boston's logan airport. the empty plane has been in service for less than a month. a cleaning crew found the cabin filled with smoke. there were no injuries, and federal officials are investigating. >>> and the "new york post" says hillary clinton got a football helmet as a gag gift from her state depar
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